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How do I map a network drive in windows XP?

Article ID: 205
Last updated: 15 May, 2012

How To Map a Network Drive in Windows XP Using Windows Explorer

Windows XP supports several different methods for mapping a network drive. A network drive is a file folder located on a remote computer that has been configured for sharing over a network These instructions explain the process to map a shared network drive using Windows Explorer.

Difficulty: Easy

Time Required: 1 minute

**Please note,  For security reasons you will only have access to the areas designated for your position.   If you require access to an area outside of your department a helpdesk request must be made by the director or VP of the area you wish to access.   They can contact the helpdesk at 244-4777 or at helpdesk@sage.edu

Here's How:

  1. Open My Computer from the Windows Start Menu or bny double clicking on it from the desktop
  2. From the Tools menu, click Map Network Drive…. A new Map Network Drive window opens.
  3. In the Map Network Drive window, choose an available drive letter from the dropdown list located next to the "Drive:" option. Any drives already mapped will have a shared folder name displayed inside the dropdown list, next to the drive letter.
  4. Type the name of the folder to map . Alternatively, click the Browse… button to find the correct folder by browsing available network shares.

(Example:  to connect to The VPAA share on the NAS the foldername would be \\nas-t\share\vpaa )

Call the helpdesk if you are unsure of where your folder is located.

  1. Click the "Reconnect at login" checkbox if this network drive should be mapped permanently. Otherwise, this drive will un-map when the user logs out of this computer.
  2. If the remote computer that contains the shared folder requires a different username and password to log in, click the "different user name" hyperlink to enter this information.
  3. Click Finish.
  4. If the drive letter was previously mapped to a different location, a message box will appear asking to replace the current connection with the new one. Click Yes to disconnect and un-map the old mapped drive.
  5. If the Finish operation succeeds, the network drive will be mapped. If the network drive cannot be mapped, ensure the folder name is spelled correctly, that this folder was correctly set up for sharing on the remote computer, that (if necessary) the correct username and password have been entered, and that the computer network connections are functioning properly.

Tips:

  1. To disconnect a mapped network drive, use the Tools/Disconnect Network Drive… option in Windows Explorer, or right-click on the folder in My Computer and choose the "Disconnect" menu option.

What You Need:

  • A local computer running Microsoft Windows XP

  • The folder name name of a shared folder on a remote computer

  • Working LAN connections on both the local and remote computers

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For more information or to get assistance,  Contact the helpdesk at 518-244-4777 or by emailing helpdesk@sage.edu.

Article submitted by Jon Brennan

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As computer users, we have become accustomed to icons that represent files, folders, programs, and other objects on the computer. Many software programs also use icons to represent tools, which are often found in the program\'s toolbar. While these icons can save screen space and make the program\'s interface more attractive, it can sometimes be difficult to tell what all the tool icons mean. While some tool icons are obvious (such as a printer icon to print and a scissors icon to cut a text selection), others are a bit more ambiguous. For this reason, programs often include tooltips that explain what each tool icon represents.

Tooltips are displayed when you roll over an icon with the cursor. It may take a second or two to display the tooltip, but when it does appear, it usually is a small box with a yellow background explaining what the icon represents. For example, in Microsoft Word, when you roll over the disk icon, the tooltip \"Save\" appears. This means clicking on the disk icon will save your document. In Photoshop, when you roll over the wand icon, the text \"Magic Wand Tool (W)\" appears. This indicates that clicking the the wand icon or pressing the W key will activate the magic wand selection tool.

Not all programs incorporate tooltips, but most modern programs include them as part of a user-friendly interface. Operating systems also support them in different ways. For example, Mac OS X will show the full text of a long filename when you place the cursor over the filename. Windows includes tooltips for the systray icons and also tells you information about each file and folder you place the cursor over. If you drag your cursor over different icons on your computer, you may find tooltips you never knew were there!

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A process is a program that is running on your computer. This can be anything from a small background task, such as a spell-checker or system events handler to a full-blown application like Internet Explorer or Microsoft Word. All processes are composed of one or more threads.

Since most operating systems have many background tasks running, your computer is likely to have many more processes running than actual programs. For example, you may only have three programs running, but there may be twenty active processes. You can view active processes in Windows by opening the Task Manager (press Ctrl-Alt-Delete and click Task Manager). On a Mac, you can see active processes by opening Activity Monitor (in the Applications->Utilities folder).

The term \"process\" can also be used as a verb, which means to perform a series of operations on a set of data. For example, your computer\'s CPU processes information sent to it by various programs.

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Your computer\'s desktop is much like a physical desktop. You probably keep a number of commonly used items on your desk such as pens, papers, folders, and other items. Your computer\'s desktop serves the same purpose -- to give you easy access to items on your hard drive. It is common to store frequently used files, folders, and programs on your desktop. This allows you to access the items quickly instead of digging through the directories on your hard drive each time you want to open them.

Both the Macintosh and Windows interfaces use the desktop as a central part of the interface. Both operating systems allow you to move items on and off the desktop as you wish and offer organization tools to arrange and clean up the items on the desktop. Yes, it would be nice if there was an option like that for a real-life desktop. You can also customize your computer\'s desktop with the pattern or background image of your choice.

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When you have two or more computers connected to each other, you have a network. The purpose of a network is to enable the sharing of files and information between mulitple systems. The Internet could be described as a global network of networks. Computer networks can be connected through cables, such as Ethernet cables or phone lines, or wirelessly, using wireless networking cards that send and receive data through the air.

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This term is used to describe the architecture of an integrated circuit. For example, the chipset of a modem card would be much different than the chipset of a computer\'s CPU. Processors themselves also have different chipsets. For example, a Pentium II and Pentium III have slightly different chipsets, and the PowerPC processors have other kinds. Though there are many different types of chipsets that reside in today\'s computer hardware, the average user does not need to know much about them. After all, as long it works, who cares? =)

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Microsoft Windows is the most popular operating system for personal computers. There are several versions of the Windows operating system, including Windows XP (for home users) and Windows 2000 (for professional users). Earlier versions of Windows include Windows 3.1, 95, 98, ME, and NT. All Windows platforms use a graphical user interface (GUI), like the Mac OS, and also offer a command-line interface for typing text commands.

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Stands for \"Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol.\" These two protocols were developed in the early days of the Internet by the U.S. military. The purpose was to allow computers to communicate over long distance networks. The TCP part has to do with the verifying delivery of the packets. The IP part refers to the moving of data packets between nodes. TCP/IP has since then become the foundation of the Internet. Therefore, TCP/IP software is built into all major operating systems, such as Unix, Windows, and the Mac OS.

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Just like real world folders, folders on your hard drive store files. These files can be documents, programs, scripts, libraries, and any other kind of computer file you can think of. Folders can also store other folders, which may store more files or other folders, and so on.

Folders allow people to organize their files in a way that makes sense to them. For example, a college student might store all her photos in a folder named \"Pictures,\" all her papers in a folder named \"School Work,\" and all her financial information (including the tens of thousands of dollars in student loans) in a folder named \"Finances.\" All these folders might reside within a folder called \"My Documents.\"

The computer\'s operating system also uses folders to store data such as system files, library files, and user preferences. Often, the folders that the system uses are locked, meaning users cannot alter their contents.

While folders can store several gigabytes of data, folders themselves hardly take up any space on the hard drive. This is because the folders are really just pointers to files and other folders, telling the computer where they are located. The compilation of folders on your hard drive make up the \"directory structure,\" or overall organization of your hard drive. For this reason, folders are also referred to as \"directories.\" Thank goodness for folders, because without them our hard drives would be pretty cluttered!

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In order for storage media, such as a hard drive, to be recognized by your computer, it needs to be formatted. Formatting a disk involves testing the disk and writing a new directory structure, or \"address table,\" onto the disk. If you would like to erase or initialize a hard drive, you can use a disk utility program to reformat it. This will create an blank, empty disk for storing your files. While the disk appears to be empty, most of the files on the disk are actually untouched by the formatting process. When you format a disk, it creates a new address table, making the entire disk available for writing. However, the files are still on the disk -- they just don\'t show up since the are no longer part of the directory structure. So if you accidentally format a disk (which is pretty hard to do), you can still retrieve most of your files using an advanced disk utility such as Norton Disk Doctor or DiskWarrior.

The term \"format\" can also be used to describe the layout or style of text in a text document. When you format the layout, you choose the page margins and the line spacing. When you format the text, you choose the font, the size, and the styles, such as bold, italic, and underlined.

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Microsoft Access, often abbreviated \"MS Access,\" is a popular database application for Windows. Access allows users to create custom databases that store information in an organized structure. The program also provides a visual interface for creating custom forms, tables, and SQL queries. Data can be entered into an Access database using either visual forms or a basic spreadsheet interface. The information stored within an Access database can be browsed, searched, and accessed from other programs, including Web services.

While Access is a proprietary database management system (DBMS), it is compatible with other database programs since it supports Open Database Connectivity (ODBC). This allows data to be sent to and from other database programs, such as MS SQL, FoxPro, Filemaker Pro, and Oracle databases. This compatibility also enables Access to serve as the back end for a database-driven website. In fact, Microsoft FrontPage and Expression Web, as well as ASP.NET have built-in support for Access databases. For this reason, websites hosted on Microsoft Windows servers often use Access databases for generating dynamic content.

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A computer script is a list of commands that are executed by a certain program or scripting engine. Scripts may be used to automate processes on a local computer or to generate Web pages on the Web. For example, DOS scripts and VB Scripts may be used to run processes on Windows machines, while AppleScript scripts can automate tasks on Macintosh computers. ASP, JSP, and PHP scripts are often run on Web servers to generate dynamic Web page content.

Script files are usually just text documents that contain instructions written in a certain scripting language. This means most scripts can be opened and edited using a basic text editor. However, when opened by the appropriate scripting engine, the commands within the script are executed. VB (Visual Basic) scripts, for example, will run when double-clicked, using Windows\' built-in VB scripting support. Since VB scripts can access and modify local files, you should never run a VB script that you receive as an unknown e-mail attachment.

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A window is an area on the screen that displays information for a specific program. This often includes the user interface GUI as well as the program content. Windows are used by most applications as well as the operating system itself. A typical window includes a title bar along the top that describes the contents of the window, followed by a toolbar that contains user interface buttons. Most of the window\'s remaining area is used to display the content.

Examples:

  1. Web Browser windows:
    The top of a typical Web browser window contains a title bar that displays the title of the current page. Below the title is a toolbar with back and forward buttons, an address field, bookmarks, and other navigation buttons. Below the toolbar is the content of the current Web page. The bottom of the window may contain a status bar that displays the page loading status

  2. Word Processing windows:
    A window used by a word processing program, such as Microsoft Word, typically includes buttons for page and text formatting, followed by a ruler that defines the document area. Below the ruler is the main page area used for entering text.

  3. Operating System windows:
    Windows used by the operating system typically include navigation buttons along the top and shortcuts to folders and other locations on the left side of the window. The rest of the window is used to display icons or lists of files and folders.

Most windows can be opened, closed, resized, minimized, and moved around the screen. The close, minimize, and zoom buttons are located on the title bar (on the right side on Windows and the left side on Macs). Minimizing a window will close the contents of the window, but store a reference to it in the Taskbar (Windows) or the Dock (Mac). Closing a window will make it disappear completely (so you may be asked to save your changes first). To move a window, click on the title bar and drag the window where you want it. To resize a window, either click the Zoom button in the title bar or click the lower right-hand corner and expand or contract the window to the size you want.

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Turion technology is AMD new platform to compete against Intel\'s Centrino technology.

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Stands for \"Extensible Hypertext Markup Language.\" Yes, apparently \"Extensible\" starts with an \"X.\" XHTML is a spinoff of the hypertext markup language (HTML) used for creating Web pages. It is based on the HTML 4.0 syntax, but has been modified to follow the guidelines of XML, the Extensible Markup Language. Therefore, XHTML 1.0 is sometimes referred to as HTML 5.0.

Because XHTML is \"extensible,\" Web developers can create their own objects and tags for each Web page they build. This gives the developers more control over the appearance and organization of their Web pages. The only requirement is that the custom tags and attributes are defined in a document type definition (DTD), that is referenced by the XHTML page.

XHTML pages must also conform to a more strict syntax than regular HTML pages. While Web browsers are rather lenient and forgiving of HTML syntax, XHTML pages must have perfect syntax. This means no missing quotes or incorrect capitalization in the markup language. While the strict syntax requires more meticulous Web page creation, it also ensures Web pages will appear more uniform across different browser platforms.

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If you are ever asked to enter your username and password, you are being asked to enter your login information. A login is a combination of information that authenticates your identity. This could be a name and password or an ID number and security code. Many secure Web sites use login information to authenticate visitors before allowing them access to certain areas of the site. Unlike the words \"brush\" and \"comb,\" this term should not be used as both a noun and a verb. It should only be used as a noun, (you don\'t login to a server, you log in to it).

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In general, \"media\" refers to various means of communication. For example, television, radio, and the newspaper are different types of media. The term can also be used as a collective noun for the press or news reporting agencies. In the computer world, \"media\" is also used as a collective noun, but refers to different types of data storage options.

Computer media can be hard drives, removable drives (such as Zip disks), CD-ROM or CD-R discs, DVDs, flash memory, USB drives, and yes, floppy disks. For example, if you want to bring your pictures from your digital camera into a photo processing store, they might ask you what kind of media your pictures are stored on. Are they on the flash memory card inside your camera or are they on a CD or USB drive? For this and many other reasons, it is helpful to have a basic understanding of what the different types of media are.

'; glosarry_items[34] = '

Stands for \"Voice Over Internet Protocol,\" and is often pronounced \"voip.\" VoIP is basically a telephone connection over the Internet. The data is sent digitally, using the Internet Protocol (IP) instead of analog telephone lines. This allows people to talk to one another long-distance and around the world without having to pay long distance or international phone charges.

In order to use VoIP, you need a computer, an Internet connection, and VoIP software. You also need either a microphone, analog telephone adapter, or VoIP telephone. Many VoIP programs allow you to use a basic microphone and speaker setup. Others requires VoIP phones, which are like regular telephone handsets, but typically connect to your computer via USB. Analog telephone adapters allow you to use regular phones with your computer. IP phones are another option that connect directly to a router via Ethernet or wirelessly. These phones have all the necessary software for VoIP built in and therefore do not require a computer.

The largest provider of VoIP services is Vonage, but there are several other companies that offer similar services. While Vonage charges a monthly service fee, programs like Skype and PeerMe allow users to connect to each other and talk for free. However, these free services may offer fewer connections, lower audio quality, and may be less reliable than paid services like Vonage.

VoIP is also referred to as IP telephony, Internet telephony, and digital phone.

'; glosarry_items[35] = '

A file is a collection of data stored in one unit, identified by a filename. It can be a document, picture, audio or video stream, data library, application, or other collection of data. The following is a brief description of each file type.

Documents include text files, such as a Word documents, RTF (Rich Text Format) documents, PDFs, Web pages, and others. Pictures include JPEGs, GIFs, BMPs, and layered image files, such as Photoshop documents (PSDs). Audio files include MP3s, AACs, WAVs, AIFs, and several others. Video files can be encoded in MPEG, MOV, WMV, or DV formats, just to name a few.

A library file is a unit of data that is referenced by a specific program or the operating system itself. These include plug-ins, components, scripts, and many others. An application is a program, or executable file. Programs such as Microsoft Internet Explorer and Apple iTunes are both applications, but are also files.

Files can be opened, saved, deleted, and moved to different folders. They can also be transferred across network connections or downloaded from the Internet. A file\'s type can be determined by viewing the file\'s icon or by reading the file extension. If the file type is associated with a specific application, double-clicking the file will typically open the file within the program.

'; glosarry_items[36] = '

Stands for \"Hyper-Text Markup Language.\" This is the language that Web pages are written in. Also known as hypertext documents, Web pages must conform to the rules of HTML in order to be displayed correctly in a Web browser. The HTML syntax is based on a list of tags that describe the page\'s format and what is displayed on the Web page.

Fortunately, the HTML language is relatively easy to learn. Even more fortunately (so much for good grammar), many Web development programs allow you to create Web pages using a graphical interface. These programs allow you to place objects and text on the page and the HTML code is written for you.

'; glosarry_items[37] = '

IPv4 is the current version of of the Internet Protocol (as of late 2006). Each computer or device connected to the Internet must use an IP address in order to communicate with other systems on the Internet. IPv4 distributes IP addresses in a 32-bit format, which looks like 111.111.111.111. Each three-digit section can include a number from 0 to 255, which means the total number of IPv4 addresses available is 4,294,967,296 (256 x 256 x 256 x 256 or 2^32).

Because the number of systems connected to the Internet is quickly approaching the number of available IP address, IPv4 addresses will run out soon. (Nice planning, guys). When you consider that there are over 6 billion people in the world and many people have more than one computer connected to the Internet (for example, at home, school, work, etc.), it is not surprising that roughly 4.3 billion addresses is not enough. Also, as mobile devices such as cell phones and PDAs begin to use Internet access more often, they will also require unique IP addresses.

To solve this situation, a new IP system, called IPv6, has been developed and is in the process of replacing the current IPv4 system. IPv6 addresses are 128-bit, which means there are exponentially more addresses available than IPv4. During this transitional process from IPv4 to IPv6, most systems connected to the Internet are assigned both an IPv4 and IPv6 address.

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The iPod is a portable music player developed by Apple Computer. Though it is an Apple product, the iPod can be used with both Macs and PCs. The iTunes software, also created by Apple, is used to organize and transfer songs and playlists to the iPod. Both iTunes and the iPod support a wide variety of audio formats, including MP3, AAC, WAV, and AIFF. MP3 is the most common audio compression format, while AAC is the format used by the iTunes Music Store. WAV and AIFF are nearly identical formats that store CD-quality audio.

Since introducing the iPod in 2001, Apple has released several new versions of the popular device. These include iPod, iPod mini, iPod Special Edition, iPod photo, and iPod shuffle. iPod mini is a smaller version of the iPod that comes in various colors and stores fewer songs. iPod Special Edition is a variation of the basic iPod (the first being a black U2 iPod with the signatures of the band members on the back). iPod photo is an iPod with a color screen that allows users to store and view a library of photos as well as play music. iPod shuffle is an extra small iPod that only holds a couple hundred songs and does not have a screen.

All iPods store data on an internal hard drive, except the iPod Shuffle, which uses flash memory. This means each iPod, including the shuffle, can also be used as a hard drive. Aside from being a music player, the iPod can serve as a backup device, a basic organizer, and an alarm clock. To transfer files to the iPod, you must first connect it to your computer using a USB or Firewire cable. iTunes can automatically transfer your playlists and songs or you can change the program\'s preferences to manually update the iPod.

Because of its superb interface and unmatched ease of use, the iPod has become the staple product of the portable music player market. Granted, the \"cool factor\" of owning an iPod has certainly helped it gain popularity as well.

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This term refers to a golf equipment brand, as well as the sound made by striking your glass with a spoon at the dinner table. However, it also has a computer-related meaning. A ping is a test to see if a system on the Internet is working. \"Pinging\" a server tests and records the response time of the server. Pinging multiple computers can be helpful in finding Internet bottlenecks, so that data transfer paths can be rerouted a more efficient way. A good way to make sure you do not get disconnected from your dial-up ISP for being idle is to send a ping every 5 minutes or so. There are a number of shareware Ping programs that will do this for you.

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Every computer system and device connected to the Internet is located by an IP address. The current system of distributing IP addresses is called IPv4. This system assigns each computer a 32-bit numeric address, such as 120.121.123.124. However, with the growth of computers connected to the Internet, the number of available IP addresses are predicted to run out in only a few years. This is why IPv6 was introduced.

IPv6, also called IPng (or IP Next Generation), is the next planned version of the IP address system. (IPv5 was an experimental version used primarily for streaming data.) While IPv4 uses 32-bit addresses, IPv6 uses 128-bit addresses, which increases the number of possible addresses by an exponential amount. For example, IPv4 allows 4,294,967,296 addresses to be used (2^32). IPv6 allows for over 340,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 IP addresses. That should be enough to last awhile.

Because IPv6 allows for substantially more IP addresses than IPv4, the addresses themselves are more complex. They are typically written in this format:

hhhh:hhhh:hhhh:hhhh:hhhh:hhhh:hhhh:hhhh

Each \"hhhh\" section consists of a four-digit hexadecimal number, which means each digit can be from 0 to 9 and from A to F. An example IPv6 address may look like this:

F704:0000:0000:0000:3458:79A2:D08B:4320

Because IPv6 addresses are so complex, the new system also adds extra security to computers connected to the Internet. Since there are so may IP address possibilities, it is nearly impossible to guess the IP address of another computer. While most computer systems today support IPv6, the new Internet procotol has yet to be fully implemented. During this transitional process, computers are often assigned both an IPv4 and an IPv6 address. By 2008, the U.S. government has mandated that all government systems use IPv6 addresses, which should help move the transition along.

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A font is a specific typeface of a certain size and style. For example, one font may be Arial 12 pt bold, while another font may be Times New Roman 14 pt italic. Most word processing programs have a Font menu that allows you to choose the typeface, size, and style of the text. In order to use a font, you must have it installed on your computer. Windows provides access to fonts using the Fonts control panel. The Mac OS stores fonts in a Fonts folder and includes a separate \"Font Book\" application for managing fonts.

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As if computer terms weren\'t hard enough to understand, there are three different meanings of the word \"port.\"

1. An Internet port. This is a number that indicates what kind of protocol a server on the Internet is using. For example, Web servers typically are listed on port 80. Web browsers use this port by default when accessing Web pages, but you can also specify what port you would like to use in the URL like this: http://www.excite.com:80. FTP uses port 21, e-mail uses port 25, and game servers, like a Quake server or Blizzard.net use various other ports. It is good to know what a port is, but you seldom have to specify it manually, so don\'t worry if this is new to you.

2. A hardware port. This refers to any one of the ports that are on the back of a computer where devices can be hooked up (like a keyboard, mouse, printer, digital camera, etc). Some common ports found on today\'s computers are USB, Firewire, and Ethernet.

3. The verb, \"port.\" This refers to the editing of a software program\'s code so that it can run on another platform. For example, to get Final Fantasy VII to run on a PC, programmers needed to port it to the PC from the Playstation. Popular Windows games are often ported to the Macintosh as well.

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Stands for \"Local Area Network,\" and is pronounced like \"land\" without the \"d\". (Computer people will think you\'re weird if you pronouce it \"L-A-N\"). A LAN is a computer network limited to a small area such as an office building, university, or even a residential home. Most mid to large-sized businesses today use LANs, which makes it easy for employees to share information. Currently, the most common type of LANs are Ethernet-based and use software from Novell or Oracle. However, with the emergence of wireless networking, wireless LANs have become a popular alternative.

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This is an automated software program that can execute certain commands when it receives a specific input (like a ro-\"bot\"). Bots are most often seen at work in the Internet-related areas of online chat and Web searching. The online chat bots do things like greet people when they enter a chat room, advertise Web sites, and kick people out of chat rooms when they violate the chat room rules. Web searching bots, also known as spiders and crawlers, search the Web and retrieve millions of HTML documents, then record the information and links found on the pages. From there, they generate electronic catalogs of the sites that have been \"spidered.\" These catalogs make up the index of sites that are used for search engine results.

'; glosarry_items[45] = '

Windows users will see this term a lot when looking for files on the Internet. A zip file (.zip) is a \"zipped\" or compressed file. For example, when you download a file, if the filename looks like this: \"filename.zip,\" you are downloading a zipped file. \"Zipping\" a file involves compressing one or more items into a smaller archive. A zipped file takes up less hard drive space and takes less time to transfer to another computer. This is why most Windows files that you find on the Internet are compressed.

To use a zipped file, you\'ll need to unzip it first. PKZIP for DOS, or WinZip for Windows, are some popular programs that can unzip files for you. Fortunately, these programs can be downloaded for free from Web sites like Download.com. Macintosh files are most often \"stuffed\" into Stuffit files (.sit), which can be \"unstuffed\" using Aladdin\'s Stuffit Expander.

The term \"Zip\" also refers to a product by Iomega. The company makes a removable storage device called a Zip Drive. Depending on the model, these drives can hold 100, 250 or 750 MB Zip disks. They are usually used for backup and for transferring large files to different locations. However, Zip drives are not as fast as hard drives, so it is usually not a good idea to run programs off them.

'; glosarry_items[46] = '

Stands for \"Blind Carbon Copy.\" When you send an e-mail to only one person, you type the recipient\'s address in the \"To:\" field. When you send a message to more than one person, you have the option to enter addresses in the \"Cc:\" and \"Bcc:\" fields. \"Cc\" stands for \"Carbon Copy,\" while \"Bcc\" stands for \"Blind Carbon Copy.\"

A carbon copy, or \"Cc\'d\" message is an e-mail that is copied to one or more recipients. Both the main recipient (whose address is in the \"To:\" field) and the Cc\'d recipients can see all the addresses the message was sent to. When a message is blind carbon copied, neither the main recipient nor the Bcc\'d recipients can see the addresses in the \"Bcc:\" field.

Blind carbon copying is a useful way to let others see an e-mail you sent without the main recipient knowing. It is faster than sending the original message and then forwarding the sent message to the other recipients. It is also good netiquette to use Bcc when copying a message to many people. This prevents the e-mail addresses from being captured by someone in the list who might use them for spamming purposes. However, if it is important that each recipient knows who your message was sent to, use carbon copy (Cc) instead.

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Stands for \"Uniform Resource Identifier.\" A URI identifies the name and location of a file or resource in a uniform format. It includes a string of characters for the filename and may also contain the path to the directory of the file. URIs provide a standard way for resources to be accessed by other computers across a network or over the World Wide Web. They are used by software programs such as Web browsers and P2P file-sharing programs to locate and download files.

URIs are similar to URLs in that they specify the location of a file. However, a URI may refer to all or part a URL. For example, Apple\'s iMac Design URL is http://www.apple.com/imac/design.html. The URI of this resource may be defined as just \"design.html\" or \"/imac/design.html.\" These are called relative URIs since they identify the resource relative to a specific location. The complete URL would be referred to as an absolute URI.

Because URLs and URIs are similar, they are often used interchangeably. In most cases, this is acceptable since the two terms often refer to the same thing. The difference is that a URI can be used to describe a file\'s name or location, or both, while a URL specifically defines a resource\'s location.

'; glosarry_items[48] = '

Stands for \"Electronic Data Interchange.\" EDI is a standardized method for transferring data between different computer systems or computer networks. It is commonly used for e-commerce purposes, such as sending orders to warehouses, tracking shipments, and creating invoices.

Because may online retailers sell products that they do not physically stock, it is important to have an easy way to transfer order information to the locations where the goods are stored. EDI makes this possible. Some common EDI formats include X12 (U.S.), TRADACOMS (U.K.), and EDIFACT (International).

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Stands for \"Network Address Translation.\" NAT translates the IP addresses of computers in a local network to a single IP address. This address is often used by the router that connects the computers to the Internet. The router can be connected to a DSL modem, cable modem, T1 line, or even a dial-up modem. When other computers on the Internet attempt to access computers within the local network, they only see the IP address of the router. This adds an extra level of security, since the router can be configured as a firewall, only allowing authorized systems to access the computers within the network.

Once a system from outside the network has been allowed to access a computer within the network, the IP address is then translated from the router\'s address to the computer\'s unique address. The address is found in a \"NAT table\" that defines the internal IP addresses of computers on the network. The NAT table also defines the global address seen by computers outside the network. Even though each computer within the local network has a specific IP address, external systems can only see one IP address when connecting to any of the computers within the network.

To simplify, network address translation makes computers outside the local area network (LAN) see only one IP address, while computers within the network can see each system\'s unique address. While this aids in network security, it also limits the number of IP addresses needed by companies and organizations. Using NAT, even large companies with thousands of computers can use a single IP address for connecting to the Internet. Now that\'s efficient.

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Stands for \"Graphical User Interface,\" and is pronounced \"gooey.\" It refers to the graphical interface of a computer that allows users to click and drag objects with a mouse instead of entering text at a command line. Two of the most popular operating systems, Windows and the Mac OS, are GUI-based. The graphical user interface was first introduced to the public by Apple with the Macintosh in 1984. However, the idea was actually taken from an earlier user interface developed by Xerox.

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UI stands for User Interface. This is the desktop program called a graphical user interface used to work with Colleague and Benefactor.

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Stands for \"Internet Protocol.\" It provides a standard set of rules for sending and receiving data through the Internet. People often use the term \"IP\" when referring to an IP address, which is OK. The two terms are not necessarily synonymous, but when you ask what somebody\'s IP is, most people will know that you are referring to their IP address. That is, most people who consider themselves computer nerds.

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Stands for \"Carbon Copy.\" The term comes from carbon copying, in which a piece of carbon paper copies writing from one paper to another (often used when filling out forms). However, the term is now commonly used in reference to e-mail. When you send an e-mail message, you typically type the recipient\'s address in the \"To:\" field. If you want to send the message to one or more other recipients, you can use the \"Cc:\" field to add additional addresses. This will send the e-mail to the address in the \"To:\" field and to each address listed in the \"Cc:\" field as well.

The \"Cc:\" option is often used in business communications when a message is intended for one person, but is relevant to other people as well. For example, a retail employee may e-mail another employee saying he can work for her on a certain day. He might include his manager\'s and assistant manager\'s e-mail addresses in the \"Cc:\" field to let them know he is taking the work shift. Similarly, a team member working on a product design may e-mail his boss with the latest design revisions and may \"Cc:\" the other members of his team to let them know the e-mail has been sent.

\"CCing\" (yes, it can also be used as a verb) is a quick way to let other people in on your e-mail communications. It is efficient because you don\'t have to send separate messages to each individual address. However, remember that When you Cc an e-mail, all the recipients can see the other addresses the message was sent to. If you want to hide the additional addresses, use Blind Carbon Copy (Bcc) instead.

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Article ID: 205
Last updated: 15 May, 2012
Revision: 1
Views: 6425
Comments: 2
Posted: 25 Aug, 2008 by -- .
Updated: 15 May, 2012 by Starnes A.
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