Search:     Advanced search

What software is available on classroom computers?

Article ID: 339
Last updated: 16 May, 2012

Below is a list of installed software on classroom computers. Please give advanced notice of any new software needed. Email helpdesk@sage.edu to submit a ticket.

7-zip
Adobe Reader X
AIM
Alice
Audacity
Dia
Eclipse
Foodworks12
Google Earth
GSP 4.07
ImgBurn
IE 8
jGrasp
Jing
MS Office 2010
Mozilla Firefox
Netbeans IDE
Quicktime
RealPlayer
RIT Client
Second Life
VLC Media Player
Windows Media Player
SPSS 19

'; glosarry_items[6] = '

Most digital camcorders record video and audio on a Mini DV tape. The cassettes measure 2.6 x 1.9 x 0.5 inches (L x W x H), while the tape itself is only .25 inches thick. A Mini DV tape that is 65 meters long can hold an incredible 11GB of data, or 80 minutes of digital video.

The small size of Mini DV tapes has helped camcorder manufacturers reduce the size of their video cameras significantly. Some consumer cameras that use Mini DV tapes are smaller than the size of your hand. Because Mini DV tapes store data digitally, the footage can be exported directly to a computer using a Firewire (IEEE 1394) cable. So if you want to record video and edit it on your computer, avoid the SVHS and Hi-8 options and make sure to get a camera that uses Mini DV.

'; glosarry_items[7] = '

Most software programs require that you first install them on your computer before using them. For example, if you buy Microsoft Office, you need to install it on your computer before you can run any of the included programs such as Word or Excel. You can install software from a CD or DVD, an external hard drive, or from a networked computer. You can also install a program or software update from a file downloaded from the Internet.

Installing a software program writes the necessary data for running the program on your hard drive. Often the installer program will decompress the data included with the installer immediately before writing the information to your hard drive. Software updates, which are typically downloaded from the Internet, work the same way. When you run the update, the installer file decompresses the data and then updates the correct program or operating system.

Installing software is usually a simple process. It involves double-clicking an installer icon and then clicking \"I Agree\" when the license agreement pops up. You may have to choose what directory on your hard disk you would like to install the software in, but often the installer will even choose that for you. Some software can be installed by simply dragging a folder or application program onto your hard drive. Either way, installing software is a rather simple process and should not be intimidating. If you can cook you dinner in the microwave, you can install your own software.

'; glosarry_items[8] = '

Microsoft Windows is the most popular operating system for personal computers. There are several versions of the Windows operating system, including Windows XP (for home users) and Windows 2000 (for professional users). Earlier versions of Windows include Windows 3.1, 95, 98, ME, and NT. All Windows platforms use a graphical user interface (GUI), like the Mac OS, and also offer a command-line interface for typing text commands.

'; glosarry_items[9] = '

Stands for \"Digital Versatile Disc Random Access Memory.\" DVD-RAMs are writable DVDs. The discs can also be erased and rewritten like the DVD-RW and DVD+RW formats. However, DVD-RAM discs work only when placed in an enclosing cartridge, meaning they won\'t fit in most standard DVD players or DVD-ROM drives. The first DVD-RAM media could hold 2.6GB on a single-sided disc, but newer double-sided discs can store up to 9.4GB.

'; glosarry_items[10] = '

As computer users, we have become accustomed to icons that represent files, folders, programs, and other objects on the computer. Many software programs also use icons to represent tools, which are often found in the program\'s toolbar. While these icons can save screen space and make the program\'s interface more attractive, it can sometimes be difficult to tell what all the tool icons mean. While some tool icons are obvious (such as a printer icon to print and a scissors icon to cut a text selection), others are a bit more ambiguous. For this reason, programs often include tooltips that explain what each tool icon represents.

Tooltips are displayed when you roll over an icon with the cursor. It may take a second or two to display the tooltip, but when it does appear, it usually is a small box with a yellow background explaining what the icon represents. For example, in Microsoft Word, when you roll over the disk icon, the tooltip \"Save\" appears. This means clicking on the disk icon will save your document. In Photoshop, when you roll over the wand icon, the text \"Magic Wand Tool (W)\" appears. This indicates that clicking the the wand icon or pressing the W key will activate the magic wand selection tool.

Not all programs incorporate tooltips, but most modern programs include them as part of a user-friendly interface. Operating systems also support them in different ways. For example, Mac OS X will show the full text of a long filename when you place the cursor over the filename. Windows includes tooltips for the systray icons and also tells you information about each file and folder you place the cursor over. If you drag your cursor over different icons on your computer, you may find tooltips you never knew were there!

'; glosarry_items[11] = '

This term is used to describe the architecture of an integrated circuit. For example, the chipset of a modem card would be much different than the chipset of a computer\'s CPU. Processors themselves also have different chipsets. For example, a Pentium II and Pentium III have slightly different chipsets, and the PowerPC processors have other kinds. Though there are many different types of chipsets that reside in today\'s computer hardware, the average user does not need to know much about them. After all, as long it works, who cares? =)

'; glosarry_items[12] = '

Stands for \"Digital Versatile Disk Rewritable.\" A DVD+RW is like a DVD+R, but can be erased and rewritten. DVD+RWs must be completely erased in order for new data to be added. DVD+RW discs can hold 4.7GB of data and do not come in double-sided or double-layer versions like DVD+Rs do. Still, 4.7GB of data is a lot of storage space. Combined with their ability to be re-recorded, DVD+RWs are a great choice for making frequent backups of your data. To record data onto a DVD+RW disc, you\'ll need a DVD burner that supports the DVD+RW format.

'; glosarry_items[13] = '

Google is the world\'s most popular search engine. It began as a search project in 1996 by Larry Page and Sergey Brin, who were two Ph.D. students at Stanford University. They developed a search engine algorithm that ranked Web pages not just by content and keywords, but by how many other Web pages linked to each page. This strategy produced more useful results than other search engines, and led to a rapid increase in Google\'s Web search marketshare. The Google ranking algorithm was later named \"PageRank\" and was patented in September of 2001. In only a short time, Google became the number one search engine in the world.

According to Google\'s website, the company\'s mission is to \"organize the world\'s information and make it universally accessible and useful.\" While the Web search remains Google\'s primary tool for helping users access information, the company offers several other services as well. Some of these include:

  • Froogle - price comparison shopping
  • Image Search - search for images on the Web
  • Google Groups - online discussion forums
  • Google Answers - answers to questions based on a bidding system
  • Google Maps - maps and directions
  • Google Toolbar - a downloadable search tool
  • Blogger - a free blogging service
  • Gmail - Web-based e-mail with several gigabytes of storage
  • AdWords - Advertising services for advertisers
  • AdSense - Advertising services for Web publishers

Google has become such a popular search engine that the term \"Google\" is now often used as a verb, synonymous with \"search.\" For example, if you are looking for information about someone, you can Google that person using Google\'s search engine.

'; glosarry_items[14] = '

Stands for \"Digital Versatile Disk Rewritable.\" A DVD-RW is like a DVD-R but can be erased and written to again. Like CD-RWs, DVD-RWs must be erased in order for new data to be added. DVD-RWs can hold 4.7GB of data and do not come in double-layered or double-sided versions like DVD-Rs do. Because of their large capacity and ability to be used mulitple times, DVD-RW discs are a great solution for frequent backups. To record data onto a DVD-RW disc, you\'ll need a DVD burner that supports the DVD-RW format.

'; glosarry_items[15] = '

In the real world, businesses have clients. In the computer world, servers have clients. The \"client-server\" architecture is common in both local and wide area networks. For example, if an office has a server that stores the company\'s database on it, the other computers in the office that can access the datbase are \"clients\" of the server.

On a larger scale, when you access your e-mail from a mail server on the Internet, your computer acts as the client that connects to the mail server. The term \"client software\" is used to refer to the software that acts as the interface between the client computer and the server. For example, if you use Microsoft Outlook to check your e-mail, Outlook is your \"e-mail client software\" that allows you to send and receive messages from the server. Isn\'t exciting how it all works?

'; glosarry_items[16] = '

Stands for \"Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol.\" These two protocols were developed in the early days of the Internet by the U.S. military. The purpose was to allow computers to communicate over long distance networks. The TCP part has to do with the verifying delivery of the packets. The IP part refers to the moving of data packets between nodes. TCP/IP has since then become the foundation of the Internet. Therefore, TCP/IP software is built into all major operating systems, such as Unix, Windows, and the Mac OS.

'; glosarry_items[17] = '

A computer script is a list of commands that are executed by a certain program or scripting engine. Scripts may be used to automate processes on a local computer or to generate Web pages on the Web. For example, DOS scripts and VB Scripts may be used to run processes on Windows machines, while AppleScript scripts can automate tasks on Macintosh computers. ASP, JSP, and PHP scripts are often run on Web servers to generate dynamic Web page content.

Script files are usually just text documents that contain instructions written in a certain scripting language. This means most scripts can be opened and edited using a basic text editor. However, when opened by the appropriate scripting engine, the commands within the script are executed. VB (Visual Basic) scripts, for example, will run when double-clicked, using Windows\' built-in VB scripting support. Since VB scripts can access and modify local files, you should never run a VB script that you receive as an unknown e-mail attachment.

'; glosarry_items[18] = '

Stands for \"Digital Versatile Disc Recordable.\" DVD+R discs look the same as regular DVDs, but can be used to record data. Single-sided, single-layer DVD+R discs can store 4.7GB of data, while double-layer discs can store 8.5GB and double-sided DVD-Rs can store 9.4GB. The DVD+R format is not quite as common as the DVD-R format, but is still supported by most current DVD players and DVD-ROM drives. Drives that can read both DVD+R and DVD-R discs are often referred to as DVD?R drives.

'; glosarry_items[19] = '

Stands for \"Digital Versatile Disc Recordable.\" A DVD-R looks the same as a regular DVD, but like a CD-R, it can be used to record data. Once a DVD-R has been \"burned,\" or written to, it cannot be written to again. A basic single-sided, single-layer DVD-R disc can store 4.7GB of data. Double-layer discs can store 8.5GB, while double-sided DVD-Rs can store 9.4GB.

DVD-R is the most common format of writable DVDs (compared to the DVD+R and DVD-RAM formats). Most DVD players and DVD-ROM drives can read DVD-R discs. That means you can use a DVD-R disc to back up several gigabytes of data on your computer or make your own video DVD. The Apple SuperDrive used in many Macintosh computers supports the DVD-R format.

'; glosarry_items[20] = '

In general, \"media\" refers to various means of communication. For example, television, radio, and the newspaper are different types of media. The term can also be used as a collective noun for the press or news reporting agencies. In the computer world, \"media\" is also used as a collective noun, but refers to different types of data storage options.

Computer media can be hard drives, removable drives (such as Zip disks), CD-ROM or CD-R discs, DVDs, flash memory, USB drives, and yes, floppy disks. For example, if you want to bring your pictures from your digital camera into a photo processing store, they might ask you what kind of media your pictures are stored on. Are they on the flash memory card inside your camera or are they on a CD or USB drive? For this and many other reasons, it is helpful to have a basic understanding of what the different types of media are.

'; glosarry_items[21] = '

A font is a specific typeface of a certain size and style. For example, one font may be Arial 12 pt bold, while another font may be Times New Roman 14 pt italic. Most word processing programs have a Font menu that allows you to choose the typeface, size, and style of the text. In order to use a font, you must have it installed on your computer. Windows provides access to fonts using the Fonts control panel. The Mac OS stores fonts in a Fonts folder and includes a separate \"Font Book\" application for managing fonts.

'; glosarry_items[22] = '

Stands for \"Voice Over Internet Protocol,\" and is often pronounced \"voip.\" VoIP is basically a telephone connection over the Internet. The data is sent digitally, using the Internet Protocol (IP) instead of analog telephone lines. This allows people to talk to one another long-distance and around the world without having to pay long distance or international phone charges.

In order to use VoIP, you need a computer, an Internet connection, and VoIP software. You also need either a microphone, analog telephone adapter, or VoIP telephone. Many VoIP programs allow you to use a basic microphone and speaker setup. Others requires VoIP phones, which are like regular telephone handsets, but typically connect to your computer via USB. Analog telephone adapters allow you to use regular phones with your computer. IP phones are another option that connect directly to a router via Ethernet or wirelessly. These phones have all the necessary software for VoIP built in and therefore do not require a computer.

The largest provider of VoIP services is Vonage, but there are several other companies that offer similar services. While Vonage charges a monthly service fee, programs like Skype and PeerMe allow users to connect to each other and talk for free. However, these free services may offer fewer connections, lower audio quality, and may be less reliable than paid services like Vonage.

VoIP is also referred to as IP telephony, Internet telephony, and digital phone.

'; glosarry_items[23] = '

The iPod is a portable music player developed by Apple Computer. Though it is an Apple product, the iPod can be used with both Macs and PCs. The iTunes software, also created by Apple, is used to organize and transfer songs and playlists to the iPod. Both iTunes and the iPod support a wide variety of audio formats, including MP3, AAC, WAV, and AIFF. MP3 is the most common audio compression format, while AAC is the format used by the iTunes Music Store. WAV and AIFF are nearly identical formats that store CD-quality audio.

Since introducing the iPod in 2001, Apple has released several new versions of the popular device. These include iPod, iPod mini, iPod Special Edition, iPod photo, and iPod shuffle. iPod mini is a smaller version of the iPod that comes in various colors and stores fewer songs. iPod Special Edition is a variation of the basic iPod (the first being a black U2 iPod with the signatures of the band members on the back). iPod photo is an iPod with a color screen that allows users to store and view a library of photos as well as play music. iPod shuffle is an extra small iPod that only holds a couple hundred songs and does not have a screen.

All iPods store data on an internal hard drive, except the iPod Shuffle, which uses flash memory. This means each iPod, including the shuffle, can also be used as a hard drive. Aside from being a music player, the iPod can serve as a backup device, a basic organizer, and an alarm clock. To transfer files to the iPod, you must first connect it to your computer using a USB or Firewire cable. iTunes can automatically transfer your playlists and songs or you can change the program\'s preferences to manually update the iPod.

Because of its superb interface and unmatched ease of use, the iPod has become the staple product of the portable music player market. Granted, the \"cool factor\" of owning an iPod has certainly helped it gain popularity as well.

'; glosarry_items[24] = '

When you \"burn a disc,\" you write data on it. If you were taking an SAT test, the analogy would look something like this:

Hard Disk : Write ::
CD/DVD : Burn

The reason the term \"burn\" is used is because the CD-writer, or burner, literally burns the data onto a writable CD. The laser in a CD-writer can be cranked up to a more powerful level than an ordinary CD-ROM laser. This enables it to engrave thousands of 1\'s and 0\'s onto a CD.

So that is why people talk about \"burning\" songs or files to CDs. They could just say they are \"writing\" the data to a CD, and it would make sense, but people seem to think \"burning\" sounds cooler.

'; glosarry_items[25] = '

IPv4 is the current version of of the Internet Protocol (as of late 2006). Each computer or device connected to the Internet must use an IP address in order to communicate with other systems on the Internet. IPv4 distributes IP addresses in a 32-bit format, which looks like 111.111.111.111. Each three-digit section can include a number from 0 to 255, which means the total number of IPv4 addresses available is 4,294,967,296 (256 x 256 x 256 x 256 or 2^32).

Because the number of systems connected to the Internet is quickly approaching the number of available IP address, IPv4 addresses will run out soon. (Nice planning, guys). When you consider that there are over 6 billion people in the world and many people have more than one computer connected to the Internet (for example, at home, school, work, etc.), it is not surprising that roughly 4.3 billion addresses is not enough. Also, as mobile devices such as cell phones and PDAs begin to use Internet access more often, they will also require unique IP addresses.

To solve this situation, a new IP system, called IPv6, has been developed and is in the process of replacing the current IPv4 system. IPv6 addresses are 128-bit, which means there are exponentially more addresses available than IPv4. During this transitional process from IPv4 to IPv6, most systems connected to the Internet are assigned both an IPv4 and IPv6 address.

'; glosarry_items[26] = '

Every computer system and device connected to the Internet is located by an IP address. The current system of distributing IP addresses is called IPv4. This system assigns each computer a 32-bit numeric address, such as 120.121.123.124. However, with the growth of computers connected to the Internet, the number of available IP addresses are predicted to run out in only a few years. This is why IPv6 was introduced.

IPv6, also called IPng (or IP Next Generation), is the next planned version of the IP address system. (IPv5 was an experimental version used primarily for streaming data.) While IPv4 uses 32-bit addresses, IPv6 uses 128-bit addresses, which increases the number of possible addresses by an exponential amount. For example, IPv4 allows 4,294,967,296 addresses to be used (2^32). IPv6 allows for over 340,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 IP addresses. That should be enough to last awhile.

Because IPv6 allows for substantially more IP addresses than IPv4, the addresses themselves are more complex. They are typically written in this format:

hhhh:hhhh:hhhh:hhhh:hhhh:hhhh:hhhh:hhhh

Each \"hhhh\" section consists of a four-digit hexadecimal number, which means each digit can be from 0 to 9 and from A to F. An example IPv6 address may look like this:

F704:0000:0000:0000:3458:79A2:D08B:4320

Because IPv6 addresses are so complex, the new system also adds extra security to computers connected to the Internet. Since there are so may IP address possibilities, it is nearly impossible to guess the IP address of another computer. While most computer systems today support IPv6, the new Internet procotol has yet to be fully implemented. During this transitional process, computers are often assigned both an IPv4 and an IPv6 address. By 2008, the U.S. government has mandated that all government systems use IPv6 addresses, which should help move the transition along.

'; glosarry_items[27] = '

Stands for \"Digital Video Interface.\" DVI is a video connection standard created by the Digital Display Working Group (DDWG). Most DVI ports support both analog and digital displays. If the display is analog, the DVI connection converts the digital signal to an analog signal. If the display is digital, no conversion is necessary.

There are three types of DVI connections: 1) DVI-A (for analog), 2) DVI-D (for digital), and 3) DVI-I (integrated, for both analog and digital). The digital video interface supports high bandwidth signals, over 160 MHz, which means it can be used for high resolution displays such as UXGA and HDTV. You may find DVI ports on video cards in computers as well as on high-end televisions.

'; glosarry_items[28] = '

Stands for \"Digital Video Interface.\" DVI is a video connection standard created by the Digital Display Working Group (DDWG). Most DVI ports support both analog and digital displays. If the display is analog, the DVI connection converts the digital signal to an analog signal. If the display is digital, no conversion is necessary.

There are three types of DVI connections: 1) DVI-A (for analog), 2) DVI-D (for digital), and 3) DVI-I (integrated, for both analog and digital). The digital video interface supports high bandwidth signals, over 160 MHz, which means it can be used for high resolution displays such as UXGA and HDTV. You may find DVI ports on video cards in computers as well as on high-end televisions.

'; glosarry_items[29] = '

Stands for \"Digital Versatile Disc.\" It can also stand for \"Digital Video Disc,\" but with the mulitple uses of DVDs, the term \"Digital Versatile Disc\" is more correct. Yep, the technology naming people just love to confuse us. A DVD is a high-capacity optical disc that looks like a CD, but can store much more information. While a CD can store 650 to 700 MB of data, a single-layer, single-sided DVD can store 4.7 GB of data. This enables massive computer applications and full-length movies to be stored on a single DVD.

The advanced DVD formats are even more amazing. There is a two-layer standard that doubles the single-sided capacity to 8.5 GB. These disks can also be double-sided, ramping up the maximum storage on a single disc to 17 GB. That\'s 26 times more data than a CD can hold! To be able to read DVDs in your computer you\'ll need a DVD-ROM drive. Fortunately, DVD players can also read CDs. To play DVD movies on your computer, you\'ll need to have a graphics card with a DVD-decoder, which most computers now have.

'; glosarry_items[30] = '

Windows users will see this term a lot when looking for files on the Internet. A zip file (.zip) is a \"zipped\" or compressed file. For example, when you download a file, if the filename looks like this: \"filename.zip,\" you are downloading a zipped file. \"Zipping\" a file involves compressing one or more items into a smaller archive. A zipped file takes up less hard drive space and takes less time to transfer to another computer. This is why most Windows files that you find on the Internet are compressed.

To use a zipped file, you\'ll need to unzip it first. PKZIP for DOS, or WinZip for Windows, are some popular programs that can unzip files for you. Fortunately, these programs can be downloaded for free from Web sites like Download.com. Macintosh files are most often \"stuffed\" into Stuffit files (.sit), which can be \"unstuffed\" using Aladdin\'s Stuffit Expander.

The term \"Zip\" also refers to a product by Iomega. The company makes a removable storage device called a Zip Drive. Depending on the model, these drives can hold 100, 250 or 750 MB Zip disks. They are usually used for backup and for transferring large files to different locations. However, Zip drives are not as fast as hard drives, so it is usually not a good idea to run programs off them.

'; glosarry_items[31] = '

Stands for \"High-Definition Video.\" According to a consortium of manufacturers including Sony, JVC, Canon, and Sharp, it is a \"consumer high-definition video format.\" HDV is the next step up from Mini DV, which has been used in consumer digital camcorders for several years. The HDV technology allows high-definition video to be recorded on a Mini DV tape, using MPEG-2 compression.

Of course, recording in high-definition requires an HD camcorder, such as the Sony HDR-FX1 or the JVC GR-HD1. These cameras are significantly more expensive than their Mini DV counterparts, but can capture much higher quality video. HDV uses a native 16:9 widescreen format, with a resolution of 1280 x 720 pixels. This is a substantial improvement over Mini DV, which records video in a 4:3 format, with a maximum resolution of 500 horizontal lines. Most HDV camcorders allow the user to record in standard DV as well, but if you shell out a couple thousand dollars extra for a HDV camcorder, you might as well shoot everything in HD.

'; glosarry_items[32] = '

Stands for \"Electronic Data Interchange.\" EDI is a standardized method for transferring data between different computer systems or computer networks. It is commonly used for e-commerce purposes, such as sending orders to warehouses, tracking shipments, and creating invoices.

Because may online retailers sell products that they do not physically stock, it is important to have an easy way to transfer order information to the locations where the goods are stored. EDI makes this possible. Some common EDI formats include X12 (U.S.), TRADACOMS (U.K.), and EDIFACT (International).

'; glosarry_items[33] = '

Stands for \"Internet Protocol.\" It provides a standard set of rules for sending and receiving data through the Internet. People often use the term \"IP\" when referring to an IP address, which is OK. The two terms are not necessarily synonymous, but when you ask what somebody\'s IP is, most people will know that you are referring to their IP address. That is, most people who consider themselves computer nerds.

'; glosarry_items[34] = '

Stands for \"Digital Video.\" Unlike traditional analog video, which is captured frame by frame on a tape, digital video is recorded digitally, as ones and zeros. Since it is stored in a digital format, digital video can be recognized and edited by a computer, which is also a digital device.

DV camcorders, including Mini DV and HDV, record digital video and therefore can export the footage to a computer using a Firewire (IEEE 1394) cable. Analog camcorders such as SVHS and Hi-8 devices must be run through a analog to digital converter (DAC) in order to be transferred to a computer.

';
Article ID: 339
Last updated: 16 May, 2012
Revision: 1
Views: 1101
Comments: 0
Posted: 02 Nov, 2010 by Tabora J.
Updated: 16 May, 2012 by -- .
Also listed in
folder Student Information

Prev   Next
Office 2007 Basics     What is 7-zip, and how do I use it?