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How to recover a lost, deleted or unsaved MS office document

Article ID: 484
Last updated: 15 Jul, 2013

How to recover a lost, deleted or unsaved MS office document

There are various methods to recover a lost document in Windows, please see detailed information below.

MS Office 2010

This is in MS word, Ms Excel and Power Point.

1. Go to File - Info - Manage Versions

In Word 2010 click on the little dropdown and select Recover Unsaved Documents.

In Excel 2010 click on Recover Unsaved Workbooks. In PowerPoint 2010 click on Recover Unsaved Presentations

MS Word opens the location where a copy of the draft resides.

 
Note: The files will be in form of .asd extesions

4. Then you can select to open and save the file to the way you want.

While opening the unsaved document, you can also make use of the Open& Repair feature for troubleshooting documents that might be corrupt or damaged.

How to recover a lost file in Word 2007 or in Word 2003

 

Method 1: Search for the original document

The original document might not have been removed from the computer. Follow these steps to see whether you can find the document:

1.      Click Start, and then click Search.

2.      In the lower-left corner of the Windows Desktop Search pane, click Click here to use Search Companion, if that option is listed.

3.      In the Search Companion pane, click All Files and Folders.

4.      In the All or part of the file name box, type the name of the document that you want to find.

5.      In the Look in box, click My Computer, and then click Search.

If the search details pane does not contain the document that you are looking for, you may have typed the file name incorrectly or the document might have a different name. Follow these steps to search for all Word documents:

1.      In the Search Companion pane, click Start a new search.

2.      Click All files and folders, and then copy and paste (or type) the following text into the All or part of the file name: box, and then click Search.

*.doc

If the details pane still does not contain the file that you are looking for, the document may have been moved to the Recycle Bin. To view the Recycle Bin and restore the document follow these steps:

1.      On the desktop, double-click Recycle Bin.

2.      On the View menu, click Details.

3.      On the View menu, click Arrange Icons by, and then click Date Deleted.

4.      Scroll through the files.

If you find the document that you are looking for, right-click the document, and then click Restore to return the document to its original location.

Note: Microsoft currently does not provide any utilities to recover documents that have been deleted, or emptied from the Recycle Bin. However, some third-party utilities to recover deleted documents may be available on the Internet.

Method 2: Search for Word backup files

If the previous method did not work for you, the main document might be gone. But there might be a backup copy of the document available. The Always create backup copy setting in Word creates backup copies of every document that you create.

First, follow one of these steps to see whether the Always create backup copy setting is enabled:

·         If you use Microsoft Office Word 2007: Click the Microsoft Office Button, click Word Options in the lower-right corner, and then click Advanced. Scroll through the headings until you find the Save section, which is close to the end of the list. If the Always create backup copy setting, located in the Save section, is selected, Word created a backup copy of the document.

·         If you use Microsoft Office Word 2003: On the Tools menu, click Options. The Always create backup copy setting is located on the Save tab. If the Always create backup copy setting is selected, Word created a backup copy of the document.

Then, if the Always create backup copy setting is not selected, go to method 3: "Force Word to try to recover a file."

If the Always create backup copy setting is selected, follow these steps to find the backup copy of the lost document:

1.      Locate the folder in which you last saved the missing document.

2.      Look for files that have the .wbk extension.

If there are no files that have the .wbk extension in the original folder, follow these steps to search the computer for all files that have the .wbk extension:

a.       Click Start, and then click Search.

b.      In the lower-left corner of the Windows Desktop Search pane, click Click here to use Search Companion.

c.       In the Search Companion pane, click All Files and Folders.

d.      In the All or part of the file name: box, copy and paste (or type) the following text:

*.wbk

e.       In the Look in box, click My Computer, and then click Search.

3.      If you find any files that are named "Backup of" followed by the name of the missing document, follow these steps to open the backup copy:

 .        Start Word.

a.       Perform one of the following actions:

§ If you use Word 2007: Click the Microsoft Office Button, click Open, click All Files (*.*) in the Files of type box, locate and select the file, and then click Open.

§ If you use Word 2003: Click Open on the File menu, click All Files (*.*) in the Files of type box, locate and select the file, and then click Open.

Method 3: Force Word to try to recover a file

If Word did not create a backup copy of the document, you might be able to use the AutoRecover feature to recover the lost document.

Note The AutoRecover feature in Word performs an emergency backup of open documents when an error occurs. Some errors can interfere with creating an AutoRecover file. The AutoRecover feature is not a substitute for saving the document.

If the Save AutoRecover information every [] minutes option is selected, Word creates a temporary AutoRecover file that includes the latest changes in the document. Every time that Word starts, it searches for AutoRecover files. If Word finds any AutoRecover files, it displays the files that it finds in the Document Recovery task pane.

First, to see whether the Save AutoRecover information every [] minutes option is selected, use one of the following steps:

·         If you use Word 2007: Click the Microsoft Office Button, click Word Options, and then click Save. The Save AutoRecover information every [] minutes option is in the Save documents section.

·         If you use Word 2003: Click Options on the Tools menu. The Save AutoRecover information every [] minutes option is located on the Save tab.

Then, if the Save AutoRecover information every [] minutes option is selected, try closing Word and reopening it. If the AutoRecover task pane appears on the left side of the screen, click the lost document to restore it.

If the Save AutoRecover information every [] minutes option is not selected, you can try to force Word to recover the document.

Use one of the following steps to force Word to recover the document:

·         If you use Word 2007: Click the Microsoft Office Button, click Open, select the Word document, click the down arrow on the Open button in the lower-right corner of the Open screen, and then click Open and Repair.

·         If you use Word 2003: Click Open on the File menu, select the Word document, click the down arrow on the Open button in the lower-right corner of the Open screen, and then click Open and Repair.

Method 4: Manually recover AutoRecover files

If Word could not open the AutoRecover file automatically or through the Open and Repair option, the AutoRecover file might be saved in a nondefault location. You might have to look for the AutoRecover file manually.

Follow these steps to search for AutoRecover files manually:

1.      Click Start, and then click Search.

2.      In the lower-left corner of the Windows Desktop Search pane, click Click here to use Search Companion, if that option is listed.

3.      In the Search Companion pane, click All Files and Folders.

4.      In the All or part of the file name: box, copy and paste (or type) the following text:

*.ASD

5.      In the Look in box, click My Computer.

6.      Click Search.

If a file that is named DocumentName.asd appears in the details pane, follow these steps to open the document:

1.      Start Word.

2.      Follow one of these steps:

o    If you use Word 2007: Click the Microsoft Office Button, and then click Open.

o    If you use Word 2003: Click Open on the File menu.

3.      In the File of type list, click All Files (*.*).

4.      Locate and select the .asd file.

5.      Click Open.

6.      Restart the computer.

7.      Start Word.

If Word finds the AutoRecover file, the Document Recovery task pane opens on the left side of the screen, and the lost document is listed as DocumentName [Original] or as DocumentName [Recovered]. If this occurs, perform one of the following actions:

·         In Word 2007, double-click the file in the Document Recovery task pane, click the Microsoft Office Button, click Save As, and then save the document as a .docx file.

·         In Word 2003, double-click the file in the Document Recovery task pane, click Save As on the File menu, and then save the document as a .doc file.

Note If an AutoRecover file in the Recovery pane does not open correctly, go to the "How to troubleshoot damaged documents" section for more information about how to open damaged files.

Method 5: Search for temporary files

If you could not find an AutoRecover file or a backup of the lost document, you might be able to recover the document from your temporary files.

To search for the lost document in your temporary files, follow these steps:

1.      Click Start, and then click Search.

2.      In the lower-left corner of the Windows Desktop Search pane, click Click here to use Search Companion.

3.      In the Search Companion pane, click All Files and Folders.

4.      In the All or part of the file name: box, copy and paste (or type) the following text:

*.TMP

5.      In the Look in box, click My Computer.

6.      Click the two chevrons next to When was it modified?.

7.      Click Specify dates, and then type the from and to dates to include the time period since you last opened the file.

8.      Click Search.

9.      On the View menu, click Details.

10. On the View menu, click Arrange Icons by, and then click Modified.

11. Scroll through the files, searching for files that match the last dates and times that you edited the document.

If you find the document that you are looking for, go to the "How to troubleshoot damaged documents" section for more information about how to recover information from the document.

Method 6: Search for ~ files

Some temporary file names start with the tilde (~) symbol. These files might not appear in the list of temporary files that you found in method 5: "Search for temporary files."

Follow these steps to find any files that begin with ~:

1.      Click Start, and then click Search.

2.      In the lower-left corner of the Windows Desktop Search pane, click Click here to use Search Companion, if that option is listed.

3.      In the Search Companion pane, click All Files and Folders.

4.      In the All or part of the file name: box, copy and paste (or type) the following text:

~*.*

5.      In the Look in box, click My Computer.

6.      Click the two chevrons next to When was it modified?.

7.      Click Specify dates, and then type the from and to dates to include the time period since you last opened the file.

8.      Click Search.

9.      On the View menu, click Details.

10. On the View menu, click Arrange Icons by, and then click Modified.

11. Scroll through the files, searching for files that match the last dates and times that you edited the document.

If you find the document that you are looking for, go to the "How to troubleshoot damaged documents" section for more information about how to recover information from the document.

How to troubleshoot damaged documents

Word automatically tries to recover a damaged document if it detects a problem with the document. You can also force Word to try to recover a document when you open it.

Follow these steps to force Word to recover the document:

1.      Follow one of these steps, depending on the version of Word that you use:

o    If you use Word 2007: Click the Microsoft Office Button, and then click Open.

o    If you use Word 2003: Click Open on the File menu.

2.      In the Files of type list, click All Files (*.*).

3.      In the Open dialog box, select the document.

4.      Click the down arrow on the Open button in the lower-right corner of the Open screen, and then click Open and Repair.

 

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In order for storage media, such as a hard drive, to be recognized by your computer, it needs to be formatted. Formatting a disk involves testing the disk and writing a new directory structure, or \"address table,\" onto the disk. If you would like to erase or initialize a hard drive, you can use a disk utility program to reformat it. This will create an blank, empty disk for storing your files. While the disk appears to be empty, most of the files on the disk are actually untouched by the formatting process. When you format a disk, it creates a new address table, making the entire disk available for writing. However, the files are still on the disk -- they just don\'t show up since the are no longer part of the directory structure. So if you accidentally format a disk (which is pretty hard to do), you can still retrieve most of your files using an advanced disk utility such as Norton Disk Doctor or DiskWarrior.

The term \"format\" can also be used to describe the layout or style of text in a text document. When you format the layout, you choose the page margins and the line spacing. When you format the text, you choose the font, the size, and the styles, such as bold, italic, and underlined.

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While downloading is receiving a file from another computer, uploading is the exact opposite. It is sending a file from your computer to another system. Pretty straight forward. It is possible to upload and download at the same time, but it may cause slower transfer speeds, especially if you have a low bandwidth connection. Because most files are located on Internet servers, people generally do a lot more downloading than uploading.

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Turion technology is AMD new platform to compete against Intel\'s Centrino technology.

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Microsoft Access, often abbreviated \"MS Access,\" is a popular database application for Windows. Access allows users to create custom databases that store information in an organized structure. The program also provides a visual interface for creating custom forms, tables, and SQL queries. Data can be entered into an Access database using either visual forms or a basic spreadsheet interface. The information stored within an Access database can be browsed, searched, and accessed from other programs, including Web services.

While Access is a proprietary database management system (DBMS), it is compatible with other database programs since it supports Open Database Connectivity (ODBC). This allows data to be sent to and from other database programs, such as MS SQL, FoxPro, Filemaker Pro, and Oracle databases. This compatibility also enables Access to serve as the back end for a database-driven website. In fact, Microsoft FrontPage and Expression Web, as well as ASP.NET have built-in support for Access databases. For this reason, websites hosted on Microsoft Windows servers often use Access databases for generating dynamic content.

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Backup is the most important computer term you should know.

A backup is a copy of one or more files created as an alternate in case the original data is lost or becomes unusable. For example, you may save several copies of a research paper on your hard drive as backup files incase you decide to use a previous revision. Better yet, you could save the backups to a USB flash disk, which would also protect the files if the hard drive failed.

Hard drives are meant to run for many years without crashing. But just like all electronic devices, they are not immune to problems. Because they are not solid state devices, hard drives rely on moving parts to access data, which can malfunction and cause your data to become unrecoverable. If you need proof of how fragile hard drives really are, go to your local computer store and have someone show you an open hard drive. When you realize all your data is stored in such a small, delicate device, you may have a new understanding of why you need to backup your data.

But it\'s not just hardware malfunctions you have to worry about. Software corruption can also damage your files. Directory structures can become damaged and cause entire folders to disappear. Files can be mistakenly deleted or corrupted by viruses or other software attacks. Program installation conflicts can make applications or files unusable. There are unfortunately many ways for your data to become damaged or disappear.

That is why it is so important to backup your data. Most people don\'t realize the importance of having a backup until it is too late. Of course, when you have lost years of photos, school papers, business documents, e-mail archives, music, movies, or any other data that you cannot recover, the importance of having a backup becomes all too real.

So how do you backup your data? The best way is to use an external storage device, such as an external hard drive, flash memory device, or even another computer. You can also create permanent backups using optical media, such as CD-R and DVD-R discs. Backing up individual folders and files is as easy copying them from the source media (your computer\'s hard disk) to the destination (an external hard drive). If you want to backup your entire system or would like to have regular backups automatically performed, you can use backup software that will backup your data for you. Many programs are available for both Mac and Windows that provide automatic backups and system restore capabilities.

If you have not yet backed up your hard drive, now is a good time to do so. It\'s much better to back up your data now than once it is too late.

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Delete is computer terminology for remove or erase. You can delete text from a document of delete entire files or folders from your hard drive. When typing a document, you can remove characters behind the cursor by pressing the delete key. If you want to remove characters in front of the cursor, you can press the smaller delete key near the home and end buttons on the keyboard. You can also remove entire sections of text by selecting the text you wish to delete and pressing either delete button on the keyboard.

Files and folders can be removed from your hard drive by dragging them to the Recycle Bin (Windows) or the Trash (Macintosh) and then emptying the trash. When you delete a file, it is actually not erased, but instead the reference to the file is removed. This means deleted files are still intact until they are written over. Special utilities such as Norton Unerase can recover accidentally deleted files.

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Stands for \"Digital Versatile Disk Rewritable.\" A DVD-RW is like a DVD-R but can be erased and written to again. Like CD-RWs, DVD-RWs must be erased in order for new data to be added. DVD-RWs can hold 4.7GB of data and do not come in double-layered or double-sided versions like DVD-Rs do. Because of their large capacity and ability to be used mulitple times, DVD-RW discs are a great solution for frequent backups. To record data onto a DVD-RW disc, you\'ll need a DVD burner that supports the DVD-RW format.

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Stands for \"Digital Versatile Disk Rewritable.\" A DVD+RW is like a DVD+R, but can be erased and rewritten. DVD+RWs must be completely erased in order for new data to be added. DVD+RW discs can hold 4.7GB of data and do not come in double-sided or double-layer versions like DVD+Rs do. Still, 4.7GB of data is a lot of storage space. Combined with their ability to be re-recorded, DVD+RWs are a great choice for making frequent backups of your data. To record data onto a DVD+RW disc, you\'ll need a DVD burner that supports the DVD+RW format.

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Stands for \"Digital Versatile Disc Recordable.\" A DVD-R looks the same as a regular DVD, but like a CD-R, it can be used to record data. Once a DVD-R has been \"burned,\" or written to, it cannot be written to again. A basic single-sided, single-layer DVD-R disc can store 4.7GB of data. Double-layer discs can store 8.5GB, while double-sided DVD-Rs can store 9.4GB.

DVD-R is the most common format of writable DVDs (compared to the DVD+R and DVD-RAM formats). Most DVD players and DVD-ROM drives can read DVD-R discs. That means you can use a DVD-R disc to back up several gigabytes of data on your computer or make your own video DVD. The Apple SuperDrive used in many Macintosh computers supports the DVD-R format.

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Microsoft Excel is a spreadsheet program for Windows and Macintosh computers. It is part of the Microsoft Office suite, which includes other productivity programs, such as Word and PowerPoint.

Though Excel is developed by Microsoft, the first version of the program was released for the Macintosh in 1985. It wasn\'t until 1987, when Microsoft introduced Windows 3.0, that Excel was made available for Windows. Since then, Microsoft has supported the program on both platforms, releasing updates about every two years.

Some other popular spreadsheet programs include IBM Lotus 1-2-3 (for Windows) and the AppleWorks spreadsheet program (for the Mac). However, Microsoft Excel has led the spreadsheet market for many years and continues to be the most popular spreadsheet program for both businesses and consumers.

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Just like you can paste a note on a sheet of paper, you can paste data into a document on a computer. The paste function can be used to paste copied data into text documents, images, Web browser address fields, and just about any place where you can enter data. However, to paste data, you first need to copy it to the \"Clipboard,\" which is a temporary storage area in your system\'s memory, or RAM. This is done by first selecting the data you want to copy and then choosing \"Copy\" from the program\'s Edit menu.

Once you have data copied to the Clipboard, you can paste it within the same document or within a different document in the same program. You can even paste copied data into a document within a different program. However, you can typically only paste data into a document with the same kind of data. For example, you cannot paste an image into your Web browser\'s address field or an audio file into image editing program.

To paste a copied piece of data, select \"Paste\" from the Edit menu in the program you wish to paste the data in. Text documents or programs with text fields will typically paste the data wherever the flashing cursor is. You can also use the keyboard shortcut \"Control-V\" for Windows or \"Command-V\" for the Mac OS to paste the data. The reason the \"V\" key is used is because the \"P\" key is usually reserved for the \"Print\" shortcut and \"V\" is right next to the \"C\" key, which is used for copying. So it might not be that intuitive at first, but it makes sense when you think about it. =)

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In general, \"media\" refers to various means of communication. For example, television, radio, and the newspaper are different types of media. The term can also be used as a collective noun for the press or news reporting agencies. In the computer world, \"media\" is also used as a collective noun, but refers to different types of data storage options.

Computer media can be hard drives, removable drives (such as Zip disks), CD-ROM or CD-R discs, DVDs, flash memory, USB drives, and yes, floppy disks. For example, if you want to bring your pictures from your digital camera into a photo processing store, they might ask you what kind of media your pictures are stored on. Are they on the flash memory card inside your camera or are they on a CD or USB drive? For this and many other reasons, it is helpful to have a basic understanding of what the different types of media are.

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Stands for \"Digital Versatile Disc Recordable.\" DVD+R discs look the same as regular DVDs, but can be used to record data. Single-sided, single-layer DVD+R discs can store 4.7GB of data, while double-layer discs can store 8.5GB and double-sided DVD-Rs can store 9.4GB. The DVD+R format is not quite as common as the DVD-R format, but is still supported by most current DVD players and DVD-ROM drives. Drives that can read both DVD+R and DVD-R discs are often referred to as DVD?R drives.

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Many software programs allow you to copy data, such as text in Microsoft Word or an image in Adobe Photoshop. To copy a piece of data, you need to first select it (or highlight it) and choose \"Copy\" from the Edit menu within the program. Most programs allow you to use the keyboard shortcut \"Control-C\" for Windows or \"Command-C\" for the Mac OS.

When you copy a piece of data, it is moved to a buffer in the system\'s memory called the \"Clipboard.\" This is a temporary storage area in your computer\'s RAM that holds the most recent item that has been copied. Of course, copying isn\'t very helpful if you can\'t use the data somewhere else. To insert the copied data into a document, choose \"Paste\" from the Edit menu and the data will be pasted into the document.

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A file is a collection of data stored in one unit, identified by a filename. It can be a document, picture, audio or video stream, data library, application, or other collection of data. The following is a brief description of each file type.

Documents include text files, such as a Word documents, RTF (Rich Text Format) documents, PDFs, Web pages, and others. Pictures include JPEGs, GIFs, BMPs, and layered image files, such as Photoshop documents (PSDs). Audio files include MP3s, AACs, WAVs, AIFs, and several others. Video files can be encoded in MPEG, MOV, WMV, or DV formats, just to name a few.

A library file is a unit of data that is referenced by a specific program or the operating system itself. These include plug-ins, components, scripts, and many others. An application is a program, or executable file. Programs such as Microsoft Internet Explorer and Apple iTunes are both applications, but are also files.

Files can be opened, saved, deleted, and moved to different folders. They can also be transferred across network connections or downloaded from the Internet. A file\'s type can be determined by viewing the file\'s icon or by reading the file extension. If the file type is associated with a specific application, double-clicking the file will typically open the file within the program.

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Ever since the Macintosh was introduced in 1984, icons have been the way we view files on computers. An icon on your computer screen represents an object or a program on your hard drive. For example, the folders you see on your desktop or in open windows are icons. The files that you see in those folders are also icons. The trash can on the Macintosh and the recycle bin on Windows are both icons as well.

Icons are a visual representation of something on your computer. For example, a blue \"e\" on your screen most likely repersents the Internet Explorer program. An icon that looks like a sheet of paper is probably a text document. By clicking and dragging icons, you can move the actual files they represent to various locations on your computer\'s hard drive. By double-clicking an application icon, you can open the program. Icons are one of the fundamental features of the graphical user interface (GUI). They make computing much more user-friendly than having to enter text commands to accomplish anything. Some Unix nerds would beg to differ, but I\'m talking about normal people here.

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A font is a specific typeface of a certain size and style. For example, one font may be Arial 12 pt bold, while another font may be Times New Roman 14 pt italic. Most word processing programs have a Font menu that allows you to choose the typeface, size, and style of the text. In order to use a font, you must have it installed on your computer. Windows provides access to fonts using the Fonts control panel. The Mac OS stores fonts in a Fonts folder and includes a separate \"Font Book\" application for managing fonts.

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Stands for \"Uniform Resource Identifier.\" A URI identifies the name and location of a file or resource in a uniform format. It includes a string of characters for the filename and may also contain the path to the directory of the file. URIs provide a standard way for resources to be accessed by other computers across a network or over the World Wide Web. They are used by software programs such as Web browsers and P2P file-sharing programs to locate and download files.

URIs are similar to URLs in that they specify the location of a file. However, a URI may refer to all or part a URL. For example, Apple\'s iMac Design URL is http://www.apple.com/imac/design.html. The URI of this resource may be defined as just \"design.html\" or \"/imac/design.html.\" These are called relative URIs since they identify the resource relative to a specific location. The complete URL would be referred to as an absolute URI.

Because URLs and URIs are similar, they are often used interchangeably. In most cases, this is acceptable since the two terms often refer to the same thing. The difference is that a URI can be used to describe a file\'s name or location, or both, while a URL specifically defines a resource\'s location.

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Stands for \"Wide Area Network.\" It is similar to a Local Area Network (LAN), but it\'s a lot bigger. Unlike LANs, WANs are not limited to a single location. Many wide area networks span long distances via telephone lines, fiber-optic cables, or satellite links. They can also be composed of smaller LANs that are interconnected. The Internet could be described as the biggest WAN in the world. You could even call the Internet a Super WAN BAM if you wanted to. Or maybe not.

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Stands for \"Extensible Markup Language.\" (Yes, technically it should be EML). XML is used to define documents with a standard format that can be read by any XML-compatible application. The language can be used with HTML pages, but XML itself is not a markup language. Instead, it is a \"metalanguage\" that can be used to create markup languages for specific applications. For example, it can describe items that may be accessed when a Web page loads. Basically, XML allows you to create a database of information without having an actual database. While it is commonly used in Web applications, many other programs can use XML documents as well.

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This is an automated software program that can execute certain commands when it receives a specific input (like a ro-\"bot\"). Bots are most often seen at work in the Internet-related areas of online chat and Web searching. The online chat bots do things like greet people when they enter a chat room, advertise Web sites, and kick people out of chat rooms when they violate the chat room rules. Web searching bots, also known as spiders and crawlers, search the Web and retrieve millions of HTML documents, then record the information and links found on the pages. From there, they generate electronic catalogs of the sites that have been \"spidered.\" These catalogs make up the index of sites that are used for search engine results.

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Stands for \"Digital Versatile Disc.\" It can also stand for \"Digital Video Disc,\" but with the mulitple uses of DVDs, the term \"Digital Versatile Disc\" is more correct. Yep, the technology naming people just love to confuse us. A DVD is a high-capacity optical disc that looks like a CD, but can store much more information. While a CD can store 650 to 700 MB of data, a single-layer, single-sided DVD can store 4.7 GB of data. This enables massive computer applications and full-length movies to be stored on a single DVD.

The advanced DVD formats are even more amazing. There is a two-layer standard that doubles the single-sided capacity to 8.5 GB. These disks can also be double-sided, ramping up the maximum storage on a single disc to 17 GB. That\'s 26 times more data than a CD can hold! To be able to read DVDs in your computer you\'ll need a DVD-ROM drive. Fortunately, DVD players can also read CDs. To play DVD movies on your computer, you\'ll need to have a graphics card with a DVD-decoder, which most computers now have.

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Stands for \"Digital Video Interface.\" DVI is a video connection standard created by the Digital Display Working Group (DDWG). Most DVI ports support both analog and digital displays. If the display is analog, the DVI connection converts the digital signal to an analog signal. If the display is digital, no conversion is necessary.

There are three types of DVI connections: 1) DVI-A (for analog), 2) DVI-D (for digital), and 3) DVI-I (integrated, for both analog and digital). The digital video interface supports high bandwidth signals, over 160 MHz, which means it can be used for high resolution displays such as UXGA and HDTV. You may find DVI ports on video cards in computers as well as on high-end televisions.

'; glosarry_items[39] = '

Stands for \"High-Definition Video.\" According to a consortium of manufacturers including Sony, JVC, Canon, and Sharp, it is a \"consumer high-definition video format.\" HDV is the next step up from Mini DV, which has been used in consumer digital camcorders for several years. The HDV technology allows high-definition video to be recorded on a Mini DV tape, using MPEG-2 compression.

Of course, recording in high-definition requires an HD camcorder, such as the Sony HDR-FX1 or the JVC GR-HD1. These cameras are significantly more expensive than their Mini DV counterparts, but can capture much higher quality video. HDV uses a native 16:9 widescreen format, with a resolution of 1280 x 720 pixels. This is a substantial improvement over Mini DV, which records video in a 4:3 format, with a maximum resolution of 500 horizontal lines. Most HDV camcorders allow the user to record in standard DV as well, but if you shell out a couple thousand dollars extra for a HDV camcorder, you might as well shoot everything in HD.

'; glosarry_items[40] = '

Stands for \"Electronic Data Interchange.\" EDI is a standardized method for transferring data between different computer systems or computer networks. It is commonly used for e-commerce purposes, such as sending orders to warehouses, tracking shipments, and creating invoices.

Because may online retailers sell products that they do not physically stock, it is important to have an easy way to transfer order information to the locations where the goods are stored. EDI makes this possible. Some common EDI formats include X12 (U.S.), TRADACOMS (U.K.), and EDIFACT (International).

'; glosarry_items[41] = '

Stands for \"Blind Carbon Copy.\" When you send an e-mail to only one person, you type the recipient\'s address in the \"To:\" field. When you send a message to more than one person, you have the option to enter addresses in the \"Cc:\" and \"Bcc:\" fields. \"Cc\" stands for \"Carbon Copy,\" while \"Bcc\" stands for \"Blind Carbon Copy.\"

A carbon copy, or \"Cc\'d\" message is an e-mail that is copied to one or more recipients. Both the main recipient (whose address is in the \"To:\" field) and the Cc\'d recipients can see all the addresses the message was sent to. When a message is blind carbon copied, neither the main recipient nor the Bcc\'d recipients can see the addresses in the \"Bcc:\" field.

Blind carbon copying is a useful way to let others see an e-mail you sent without the main recipient knowing. It is faster than sending the original message and then forwarding the sent message to the other recipients. It is also good netiquette to use Bcc when copying a message to many people. This prevents the e-mail addresses from being captured by someone in the list who might use them for spamming purposes. However, if it is important that each recipient knows who your message was sent to, use carbon copy (Cc) instead.

'; glosarry_items[42] = '

Stands for \"Digital Video Interface.\" DVI is a video connection standard created by the Digital Display Working Group (DDWG). Most DVI ports support both analog and digital displays. If the display is analog, the DVI connection converts the digital signal to an analog signal. If the display is digital, no conversion is necessary.

There are three types of DVI connections: 1) DVI-A (for analog), 2) DVI-D (for digital), and 3) DVI-I (integrated, for both analog and digital). The digital video interface supports high bandwidth signals, over 160 MHz, which means it can be used for high resolution displays such as UXGA and HDTV. You may find DVI ports on video cards in computers as well as on high-end televisions.

'; glosarry_items[43] = '

Stands for \"Digital Video.\" Unlike traditional analog video, which is captured frame by frame on a tape, digital video is recorded digitally, as ones and zeros. Since it is stored in a digital format, digital video can be recognized and edited by a computer, which is also a digital device.

DV camcorders, including Mini DV and HDV, record digital video and therefore can export the footage to a computer using a Firewire (IEEE 1394) cable. Analog camcorders such as SVHS and Hi-8 devices must be run through a analog to digital converter (DAC) in order to be transferred to a computer.

'; glosarry_items[44] = '

Stands for \"Carbon Copy.\" The term comes from carbon copying, in which a piece of carbon paper copies writing from one paper to another (often used when filling out forms). However, the term is now commonly used in reference to e-mail. When you send an e-mail message, you typically type the recipient\'s address in the \"To:\" field. If you want to send the message to one or more other recipients, you can use the \"Cc:\" field to add additional addresses. This will send the e-mail to the address in the \"To:\" field and to each address listed in the \"Cc:\" field as well.

The \"Cc:\" option is often used in business communications when a message is intended for one person, but is relevant to other people as well. For example, a retail employee may e-mail another employee saying he can work for her on a certain day. He might include his manager\'s and assistant manager\'s e-mail addresses in the \"Cc:\" field to let them know he is taking the work shift. Similarly, a team member working on a product design may e-mail his boss with the latest design revisions and may \"Cc:\" the other members of his team to let them know the e-mail has been sent.

\"CCing\" (yes, it can also be used as a verb) is a quick way to let other people in on your e-mail communications. It is efficient because you don\'t have to send separate messages to each individual address. However, remember that When you Cc an e-mail, all the recipients can see the other addresses the message was sent to. If you want to hide the additional addresses, use Blind Carbon Copy (Bcc) instead.

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Article ID: 484
Last updated: 15 Jul, 2013
Revision: 1
Views: 95754
Comments: 0
Posted: 07 Nov, 2012 by Mwandambo W.
Updated: 15 Jul, 2013 by Starnes A.
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